The Florida Capitol Report For The Week Of May 1-5

The Legislature did not finish on time this year. Today is the official last day of session, there was a 72 hour extension to the end of session in order to complete the budgeting process. Although there are a few hours left before everything is officially over, we anticipate the following issues to be resolved in the manner listed below:

– Both local police pension bills for West Palm Beach HB 1135 and Tampa HB 535 have passed. The changes to these plans are the result of local collective bargaining changes and compliance with the statute changes of 2015.

– The Governor received the body camera footage review legislation HB 305 and has until Thursday, June 11th to act (sign, veto, or do nothing which allows it to become law). The legislation permits an officer who wears a body camera to review the footage prior to making a statement, or writing a report on an incident. The effective date is July 1, 2017.

– The witness to a murder legislation HB 111 and training for autism awareness HB 39 have both passed the Legislature. HB 111 has been presented to the Governor and, like HB 305, he has until Thursday to take an action. This legislation prevents the identification of a murder witness from being available through a public record for two years.

– Totally and permanently disabled first responders & surviving spouses of totally & permanently disabled first responders shall receive a 100% homestead tax exemption via HB 455.

– There will be no increase to the FRS employee contribution. I should probably mention there will not be a decrease either.

– The Florida Retirement System will be positively modified in two significant ways for special risk members, or their surviving family members. The provisions of SB 7022 pertaining to the Florida Retirement System are as follows:

1) Survivors of a special risk member killed in the line of duty on, or after July 1, 2002 will be able to receive 100% of the member’s salary at the time of death. This benefit was added during last year’s session, but the retroactivity only went back to September of 2013.

2) Florida Retirement System employees who were enrolled in the FRS investment plan then left FRS employment and took a cash payment from the investment plan will soon be able to re-enroll in the investment plan if they are reemployed by an FRS employer. This new reemployment provision only applies to former members of the investment plan at the time of separation and does not apply to retired members of the pension plan who are reemployed by a FRS employer. The effective date is July 1, 2017.

Current employees who were previously investment plan members and have been barred from participation since reemployment are eligible after July 1, 2017 to apply for re-enrollment in the investment plan.

The change allows the member to participate in the investment plan as a member of special risk if the member qualifies.

– There is one additional change to the Florida Retirement System that does not apply to special risk members. After January 1, 2018, all new non-special risk employees will have nine months to select either the investment plan, or the pension plan. If the employee fails to make an active selection following the nine month selection period that employee will be defaulted into the investment plan. The employee will still have a one time opportunity to select the pension plan at a later date in his, or her career.

All newly hired special risk employees will continue to default into pension plan even if they do not make an active selection within the first nine months of employment. The newly hired special risk employee will also still have a one time option to make a switch later in his, or her career.

– SB 7022 also creates the ability to actively select, or collectively bargain for more options to the State Group Health Insurance for state employees. The current insurance provisions will remain in place with additional options to come on line in later years. The options will be subject to approval by the Governor, Senate President and Speaker of the House.

– Finally, SB 7022 provides pay increases to PBA’s state employee bargaining units in the following manner:

Effective July 1, 2017, there will be no increase to the employee’s Health Insurance premium.

On July 1, 2017, Law Enforcement Officers in the PBA’s Law Enforcement, Florida Highway Patrol, FDLE Special Agents and Lottery Law Enforcement bargaining units will receive a 5% increase to his, or her base rate of pay. These officers will not be eligible for the September 30, 2017 pay raise that other state employees will receive.

On September 30, 2017, All Correctional Probation Officers and Institutional Security Specialists will receive a base salary adjustment in the following manner:

a) Employees earning less than $40,000 per year of base salary will receive a $1,400 increase to his, or her base salary.

b) Employees earning more than $40,000 per year of base salary will receive a $1,000 increase to his, or her base salary.

On October 1, 2017, all Correctional Officers employed by the Florida Department of Corrections in the PBA’s Security Services bargaining unit will receive a $2,500 increase to his or her base rate of pay. These officers will not be eligible for the September 30, 2017 pay raise that other state employees will receive.

Additionally, the Department of Corrections has been awarded funding to adjust the minimum base salaries for the following class codes:

  • Correctional Officer (8003) to $33,500
  • Correctional Officer Sergeant (8005) to $36,850
  • Correctional Officer Lieutenant (8011) to $40,535
  • Correctional Officer Captain (8013) to $44,589

Correctional Officers below the new minimum base salary for the class code will receive the necessary salary adjustment to the new base amount even if the amount exceeds the $2,500.

The omnibus bill SB 7022 which dealt with FRS retirement, survivor death benefits, health insurance for state employees and pay raises for state employees is unique. The puzzle that was constructed in that legislation just goes to show how many issues the PBA was negotiating over at the end of this session. This particular bill also illustrates how every issue was leveraged against the other in order to complete a final deal.

Of course, we did not receive everything we set out to receive. Yet, we moved the needle in the right direction (in a few cases, the needle moved substantially) and did not lose any ground. We just did not get everything we wanted.

Here’s how long some of the issues in SB 7022 have been waiting to be resolved. The negotiations started in July of 2011 over the default change to the pension. The health insurance negotiations have been around since 2012. The death benefits and reemployment provisions have been in the negotiations, off and on, since 2013. And of course, we negotiated over the latest round of pay raises starting in 2016. Multiple years in many cases that all came together in one big bill SB 7022.

Considering how this 2017 version of the legislative session will finish, our team did a good job. Nobody, from the Governor on down, got everything they wanted.

There will be a four month break before the session starts all over again, PBA will be working on ideas to create a COLA reinstatement for FRS employees, along with redrafting legislation to double salary incentive monies and create a step plan for our state bargaining units. Not mention other issues that will be added to our agenda over the next four months.

As always, please stay safe.

Get In Touch With BCPBA

Broward County Police
Benevolent Association
2650 West State Road 84
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312

Telephone: (954) 584-7600
Fax: (954) 583-0405

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